News

Pet Trusts: Not Just for Leona

The real estate magnate Leona Helmsley was famously maligned when word got out after her death in 2007 that she had named her Maltese dog Trouble as the beneficiary of a $12 million trust fund. After a court battle, Trouble was forced to scrape by on trust principal reduced to $2 million. It seemed silly…

Read More

Maryland’s Favorable Retention Laws for Contractors

In recent years, the Maryland Legislature has passed several laws addressing the issue of retention on construction contracts. Historically, an owner would hold back, or retain, ten percent of the balance due on an invoice to secure final completion. As a result, this ten percent hold back flowed down to each subcontractor and supplier. Through…

Read More

Maryland’s Hourly Minimum Wage Is on the Rise

The employment law attorneys at Bowie & Jensen LLC explain the recent minimum wage change in Maryland and plans for future increases. On January 1, 2015, the hourly minimum wage in Maryland increased from $7.25 to $8.00 per hour, the first in a series of graduated increases that will see it reach $10.10 by 2018.…

Read More

2015 Super Lawyers at Bowie & Jensen LLC

Once again the attorneys at Bowie & Jensen LLC have been selected to the 2015 Maryland Super Lawyers and 2015 Maryland Rising Stars lists. Super Lawyers annually recognizes attorneys across the country who have excelled in their legal practice and achieved a high-degree of peer recognition. Attorneys undergo a thorough, patented selection process in order…

Read More

Start Over: New Foreclosure Requires a New Notice

Homeowners who have fought off foreclosure before deserve a new notice from the lender if foreclosure looms again, as Maryland’s highest court interprets the state’s foreclosure provisions strictly to require notice each time the process is started or re-started. The Maryland Court of Appeals, Maryland’s highest court, recently held that lenders must give residential borrowers…

Read More

Critical Construction Clauses: Termination for Convenience

Two people walking down the wedding aisle rarely think at the time about how to divide their assets in the event of a divorce. In some circumstances, however, the couple will have entered into a prenuptial agreement, outlining the property and financial rights of each spouse in such an event. Most construction contracts, however, do…

Read More

Are We Working Yet? When Getting Ready Is “Integral” to the Job

Courts have struggled over the years to define which of the tasks involved in preparing for work, as well as leaving it, are “compensable” to employees. Disparate results have been difficult to reconcile with each other. Recently, the U.S. Supreme Court set a more specific standard for sorting out that issue. The Portal-To-Portal Act (“the…

Read More

Face the Music Promptly or Lose Your Rights to It

New York’s top appellate court recently affirmed a lower court ruling against the estate of Duke Ellington in a claim brought against the jazz legend’s record company, EMI. The plaintiff, Ellington’s grandson, filed suit to recover royalties claimed to be due the estate under a U.S copyright renewal agreement from 1961 that covered certain relevant…

Read More